Events for Book Readings and Signings

Guest Author Cristina Henriquez

Named a New York Times and Washington Post Notable Book, an NPR Great Read, The Daily Beast's Novel of the Year, and a Mother Jones, Oprah.com, School Library Journal, and BookPage Best Book of the Year When fifteen-year-old Maribel Rivera sustains a terrible injury, the Riveras leave behind a comfortable life in Mexico and risk everything to come to the United States so that Maribel can have the care she needs. Once they arrive, it’s not long before Maribel attracts the attention of Mayor Toro, the son of one of their new neighbors, who sees a kindred spirit in this beautiful, damaged outsider. Their love story sets in motion events that will have profound repercussions for everyone involved. Here Henríquez seamlessly interweaves the story of these star-crossed lovers, and of the Rivera and Toro families, with the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America. The Book of Unknown Americans is a stunning novel of hopes and dreams, guilt and love—a book that offers a resonant new definition of what it means to be American. We're proud to partner with Salt Lake County Library Services, The Salt Lake City Library, and The Murray Library for United We Read SLC, an initiative for everyone in Salt Lake County to connect by reading the same book and sharing their experiences with one another. This year, United We Read SLC has invited Cristina Henriquez to The Viridian Event Center on Wednesday evening, January 17th, at 7:00 p.m. to discuss and sign copies her novel The Book of Unknown Americans.


Guest Author Cristina Henriquez

Named a New York Times and Washington Post Notable Book, an NPR Great Read, The Daily Beast's Novel of the Year, and a Mother Jones, Oprah.com, School Library Journal, and BookPage Best Book of the Year When fifteen-year-old Maribel Rivera sustains a terrible injury, the Riveras leave behind a comfortable life in Mexico and risk everything to come to the United States so that Maribel can have the care she needs. Once they arrive, it’s not long before Maribel attracts the attention of Mayor Toro, the son of one of their new neighbors, who sees a kindred spirit in this beautiful, damaged outsider. Their love story sets in motion events that will have profound repercussions for everyone involved. Here Henríquez seamlessly interweaves the story of these star-crossed lovers, and of the Rivera and Toro families, with the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America. The Book of Unknown Americans is a stunning novel of hopes and dreams, guilt and love—a book that offers a resonant new definition of what it means to be American. We're proud to partner with Salt Lake County Library Services, The Salt Lake City Library, and The Murray Library for United We Read SLC, an initiative for everyone in Salt Lake County to connect by reading the same book and sharing their experiences with one another. This year, United We Read SLC has invited Cristina Henriquez to The Viridian Event Center on Wednesday evening, January 17th, at 7:00 p.m. to discuss and sign copies her novel The Book of Unknown Americans.


Wallace Stegner Center Lecture featuring Jim Herrington's The Climbers

For nearly 2 decades, professional photographer Jim Herrington has been working on a portrait series of influential rock and mountain climbers. The Climbers documents these rugged individualists who, from roughly the 1930s to 1970s, used primitive gear along with their considerable wits, talent, and fortitude to tackle unscaled peaks around the world. Today, these men and women are renowned for their past accomplishments and, in many cases, are the last of the remaining practitioners from the so-called “Golden Age” of 20th century climbing. Herrington’s images—the result of his own passion for climbing—allow us to study the faces of climbers who were driven to do the impossible for no other reason than the challenge. In these portraits we find people who ascended bold, visionary lines, often in remote regions, away from the media spotlight and without any hope for reward. Yet in many ways the severe routes these men and women established outshine today’s ascents due, in part, to the fact that rope and other gear were so strikingly inferior to today. And often our pioneering predecessors were climbing into a malevolent unknown—if compromised or injured, the only people in the world likely capable of initiating their rescue were the climbers themselves. Innovation emerged frequently and in unlikely ways. In these images, Herrington has captured the utter humanity of obsession, determination, intellect, and frailty. Visit the event website for more: http://www.law.utah.edu/event/wallace-stegner-center-lecture-jim-herrington/


Wallace Stegner Center Lecture featuring Jim Herrington's The Climbers

For nearly 2 decades, professional photographer Jim Herrington has been working on a portrait series of influential rock and mountain climbers. The Climbers documents these rugged individualists who, from roughly the 1930s to 1970s, used primitive gear along with their considerable wits, talent, and fortitude to tackle unscaled peaks around the world. Today, these men and women are renowned for their past accomplishments and, in many cases, are the last of the remaining practitioners from the so-called “Golden Age” of 20th century climbing. Herrington’s images—the result of his own passion for climbing—allow us to study the faces of climbers who were driven to do the impossible for no other reason than the challenge. In these portraits we find people who ascended bold, visionary lines, often in remote regions, away from the media spotlight and without any hope for reward. Yet in many ways the severe routes these men and women established outshine today’s ascents due, in part, to the fact that rope and other gear were so strikingly inferior to today. And often our pioneering predecessors were climbing into a malevolent unknown—if compromised or injured, the only people in the world likely capable of initiating their rescue were the climbers themselves. Innovation emerged frequently and in unlikely ways. In these images, Herrington has captured the utter humanity of obsession, determination, intellect, and frailty. Visit the event website for more: http://www.law.utah.edu/event/wallace-stegner-center-lecture-jim-herrington/


Paisley Rekdal and Natalie Taylor read at Read Local Series

The latest event in the Finch Lane Gallery Read Local Series will be Thursday, January 25 at 7:00 p.m. at the Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane. The event is free of charge. Taylor won first place in the 2016 Utah Originial Writing competition and was named a 2017 Mari Sandoz Emerging Writer. She will read from her book “Eden’s Edge.” Rekdal, Utah’s Poet Laureate is the author of books of essays, five books of poetry, and a hybrid-genre photo-text books. Rekdal will read from “Imaginary Vessels.” A conversation about the writing process will be facilitated by David G. Pace.


Get Curious

Are you and your kids curious about science and art? Explore texture, color, building and bubbles through hands-on play and experiments.


Guest Author James Ure

His new exposé examines how the Mormon Church tried to destroy the Salt Lake Tribune, a voice that had long been critical of many of its activities and its secrets. The author, a Mormon and a journalist who once worked for the Tribune, tells a story of secret deals, behind-the-scenes backstabbing, and manipulation of the political and legal systems by a church that controls the politics of Utah. Based on many interviews and extensive research, the book describes the history of enmity between the Church and the newspaper, which came to a head in 2000. In that year, the Tribune reopened an investigation into an 1857 murder of a wagon train of 120 men, women, and children passing through Utah. The Mountain Meadow Massacre had been conducted by highly-placed church members and historians have said it was condoned by Brigham Young, the leader of the Mormon Church. The published stories intensified efforts by the Church to kill the newspaper. When a hedge fund took ownership of the Tribune, the Church in 2013 saw an opportunity to take advantage and ensure the paper's demise. Just as the paper appeared to be going under, a small group of citizens became the David that took down the Mormon Goliath and delivered the Pulitzer Prize-winning paper to a steady local owner who is willing to fight for its long-term survival. This is a cautionary tale about the dangers of mingling church and state and the ways in which big money can threaten the freedom of the press. Join us in welcoming James Ure to The Printed Garden Thursday night, February 1st, for what is sure to be an extremely interesting discussion. James will answer questions about his book and will be signing copies.


Guest Author James Ure

His new exposé examines how the Mormon Church tried to destroy the Salt Lake Tribune, a voice that had long been critical of many of its activities and its secrets. The author, a Mormon and a journalist who once worked for the Tribune, tells a story of secret deals, behind-the-scenes backstabbing, and manipulation of the political and legal systems by a church that controls the politics of Utah. Based on many interviews and extensive research, the book describes the history of enmity between the Church and the newspaper, which came to a head in 2000. In that year, the Tribune reopened an investigation into an 1857 murder of a wagon train of 120 men, women, and children passing through Utah. The Mountain Meadow Massacre had been conducted by highly-placed church members and historians have said it was condoned by Brigham Young, the leader of the Mormon Church. The published stories intensified efforts by the Church to kill the newspaper. When a hedge fund took ownership of the Tribune, the Church in 2013 saw an opportunity to take advantage and ensure the paper's demise. Just as the paper appeared to be going under, a small group of citizens became the David that took down the Mormon Goliath and delivered the Pulitzer Prize-winning paper to a steady local owner who is willing to fight for its long-term survival. This is a cautionary tale about the dangers of mingling church and state and the ways in which big money can threaten the freedom of the press. Join us in welcoming James Ure to The Printed Garden Thursday night, February 1st, for what is sure to be an extremely interesting discussion. James will answer questions about his book and will be signing copies.


Guest Author James Ure

His new exposé examines how the Mormon Church tried to destroy the Salt Lake Tribune, a voice that had long been critical of many of its activities and its secrets. The author, a Mormon and a journalist who once worked for the Tribune, tells a story of secret deals, behind-the-scenes backstabbing, and manipulation of the political and legal systems by a church that controls the politics of Utah. Based on many interviews and extensive research, the book describes the history of enmity between the Church and the newspaper, which came to a head in 2000. In that year, the Tribune reopened an investigation into an 1857 murder of a wagon train of 120 men, women, and children passing through Utah. The Mountain Meadow Massacre had been conducted by highly-placed church members and historians have said it was condoned by Brigham Young, the leader of the Mormon Church. The published stories intensified efforts by the Church to kill the newspaper. When a hedge fund took ownership of the Tribune, the Church in 2013 saw an opportunity to take advantage and ensure the paper's demise. Just as the paper appeared to be going under, a small group of citizens became the David that took down the Mormon Goliath and delivered the Pulitzer Prize-winning paper to a steady local owner who is willing to fight for its long-term survival. This is a cautionary tale about the dangers of mingling church and state and the ways in which big money can threaten the freedom of the press. Join us in welcoming James Ure to The Printed Garden Thursday night, February 1st, for what is sure to be an extremely interesting discussion. James will answer questions about his book and will be signing copies.


Guest Author Dan Wells

From Dan Wells, author of the New York Times bestselling Partials Sequence, comes the third installment in a thrilling sci-fi noir series set in 2050 Los Angeles. Even in a world where technology connects everyone’s minds, it would seem that some secrets can still remain hidden. For all the mysteries teen hacker Marisa Carneseca has solved, one has always eluded her: When she was two years old, she was in a car accident in which she lost her arm and a mob boss’s wife, Zenaida de Maldonado, lost her life. No one can tell her what she was doing in that car, or how it led to the feud between the Carnesecas and the Maldonados. The secrets from the past rise violently to the surface when Zenaida's freshly severed hand shows up at the scene of a gangland shooting. If Zenaida is—or was—still alive, it means there’s even more about Marisa’s past that she doesn’t know. And when everyone from Los Angeles gangs to the world’s largest genetic engineering firms becomes involved in the case, it’s clear there’s more happening under the surface than anyone cares to admit. ‚Äč The truth is out there, and Marisa will have to thread together lost friends, corporate assassins, a gang lord’s digital brain, and what might be a literal ghost from the past in order to find it. Join us Thursday, February 15th, for a very special dual-author event featuring Dan Wells in conversation with Matthew J. Kirby about their two new books! Dan will be talking about Active Memory, the third book in his Mirador series, and Matt will be discussing his third Assassin's Creed book, Fate of the Gods, along with pretty much anything else you'd like them to address! This event begins at 7:00 p.m.